Understanding

Bullying

What is Bullying?

Bullying is a form of abuse that can occur anywhere, for example, in your community, at work or in your own home. If you work in the horseracing industry and are being bullied, do not hesitate to contact us for non-judgemental and confidential support from one of our team.

Some types of bullying (for example physical) may be more obvious than others and small incidents on their own may not be a problem but when added together they can amount to serious bullying. There is usually an imbalance of power, repetition, intent to cause harm and it may make you feel afraid, degraded, demeaned, scared, intimidated, anxious or hurt. It can also cause stress related symptoms such as insomnia, nightmares, headaches, or exhaustion.

3 steps against bullying

1. Talk to someone. This can either be a friend/relative/boss or the bully themselves. Speaking to a counsellor may also be something to consider.

2. Document all the incidents that occur, including when/where/who was involved and how it made you feel. This is useful for when you speak to someone but will also be needed if you decide to take legal action at a later date.

3. Make a formal complaint - If you have spoken to someone and it has not resolved the situation the next step may be a formal complaint to the police, or if it occurs at work, follow the employer's grievance procedure or you can seek legal advice.

There are a number of organisations that can offer further advice and information on bullying at any stage of the process, even if you are unsure of whether you are being bullied or not. You can also seek advice if you have noticed someone else being bullied.


Get Help

If you feel you are being bullied or are worried about someone else and need to talk to someone confidentially then you can contact Racing Welfare by email or call our team on 0800 6300 443

If you would prefer to chat online you can use our live chat service. Racing Welfare can provide a range of support from a listening ear to a referral with a local Welfare Officer or professional Counsellor.

Other pages you may find helpful:


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